NMN Stifles Mouse Inflammation Response Like NSAIDs

Similar to anti-inflammatory drugs, treating immune cells called macrophages with NMN inhibits chronic inflammation that can cause cancer and insulin resistance.

In a vicious cycle, inflammation in any body region like the joints activates immune cells called macrophages that secrete more inflammation-inducing substances to drive chronic inflammation. This perpetual inflammation can trigger diseases like insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque in blood vessels. To combat this detrimental chain of events, people use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen. But prolonged NSAID usage can cause harmful side effects like intestinal bleeding. So, finding safer ways to treat inflammation is critical for people who have persistent inflammation to avoid injurious NSAID reactions.

Research by Deng and colleagues shows that treating mouse macrophage immune cells with 500 µM nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) reverses the buildup of inflammation-associated molecules, including proteins and byproducts of metabolism. In a study published in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, the Tsinghua University researchers show that NMN inhibits macrophage inflammatory response. If future clinical studies determine that NMN regulates macrophage-perpetuating inflammation in humans, supplementing with the molecule may provide a means to sidestep NSAID side effects.

CH TRADITIONAL
CH TRADITIONAL