Long-term NMN Administration Has Anti-Aging Effects in Ovaries

Mid-aged mice treated for 20 weeks with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) – a precursor to a vital molecule – show improved fertility potential and reduced aging of ovaries.

The relationship between female fertility and aging is complex. We know for sure that the number of eggs (ovum) and the window for their fertilization are limited by ovarian aging. As women get older, the ability to support conception shrinks like a reverse snowball: the quantity and quality of structures that can support the ovum called ovarian follicles gradually decline, ending with menopause. Since menopause and the preceding decline in oocyte quality seem to have a fixed time interval, treatments that expand the female reproductive lifespan are highly sought after.

Researchers from Jiangsu University in China demonstrate that long-term treatment with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) has anti-aging effects on ovaries. In an article published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Huang and colleagues show that 20 weeks of oral NMN treatment (0.5 mg/mL/day) could improve mid-aged ovary aging, preserving the ovarian reserve. In mid-aged mice, this NMN treatment regimen improved the structure of ovaries and reduced senescence — a phenomenon characterized by the cessation of cell replication, which is linked to aging.

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