Intestinal Bacterium and NMN Synergistically Enhance Skin Protection

Intestinal Bacterium and NMN Synergistically Enhance Skin Protection

The skin is one of the most complex organs in our bodies and has an integral connection to the gut. Skin anti-aging has become a research hotspot of many scholars and clinicians and has captivated the attention of many beauty seekers. So, what if we could harness what we know about this connection to improve skincare? 

Zhao and colleagues from the Chongqing University of Education in China published a study in Frontiers in Pharmacology showing that combining an intestinal bacteria with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) synergistically improved mouse skin damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. They found that mice that drank water containing NMN (300 mg/kg) along with Lactobacillus fermentum extract saw greater protective effects than either NMN or the bacterium individually. These findings suggest that NMN and the bacterium provide skin protection through different pathways and that using them together may provide a means to enhance skin health.

The Anti-Aging Properties of NMN and L. fermentum

Photoaging is premature aging of the skin caused by repeated exposure to UV radiation, primarily from the sun but also from artificial UV sources. The occurrence and development of skin photoaging mediated by UV radiation involve multiple pathways, including inflammation and responses to oxidative stress. Studies have shown that intestinal bacterial composition can modulate skin inflammation and that skin UV radiation exposure alters the gut bacterial composition. Figuring out how to utilize the skin-gut connection could enhance the way we protect our skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays.

L. fermentum bacteria have been shown to balance the composition of intestinal bacteria (the microbiome). This intestinal bacterium also can enhance the immune system, lower cholesterol levels, and reduce the presence of harmful molecules called free radicals that cause oxidative stress. The potential anti-aging properties of this intestinal bacterium along with its ability to clear free radicals has drawn the attention of researchers looking for ways to enhance skin protection and health.

Another antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound is NMN, which boosts levels of a crucial molecule for energy production and maintenance of cell health called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). There’s compelling evidence that taking NMN reduces free radicals and inflammation in organs like the liver and also provides anti-aging benefits.

Some reports indicate that both NMN and L. fermentum have a protective effect on the skin damaged by UV. For these reasons, Zhao and colleagues decided to test the protective effects of NMN and L. fermentum on skin damaged by UV radiation. 

 

 

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