Grape Seed Extract and NMN Protect Mouse Retinal Cells from Aging, Study Finds

The berry-based compound proanthocyanidin may help millions suffering from retinal disorders and protect many from blindness by boosting NAD+ levels.

Our senses enable us to experience the world, especially sight (at least for humans). But many people, more than half a billion patients worldwide, are affected by retinal degenerative disorders and blindness. These visual disorders are often driven by age-related cell senescence, which describes when cells can no longer replicate, causing disruptive changes in the retina. Understanding cell senescence in the eye can provide clues for treating retinal disease, which remains a significant problem that needs to be solved urgently. Fortunately, we may not need to look much further than some widely available fruit.

Researchers from The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University alleviate retinal cellular senescence in aging mice using a compound extracted from grape seeds called proanthocyanidin. This Chinese research team showed that the grape seed extract works by boosting an enzyme that generates nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). This study, published in the Journal of Inflammation Research, highlighted the potential effects of this plant-based molecule on degenerative eye diseases.

 

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